Kat's Nip

is Sold Out (for now) 

I am sold out! I’m sorry about that – I sold 4 times as much this year as I did last year, and most of those sales came over a single weekend. It’s clear Kiwi kitties are pretty fond of the occasional wake’n’bake.

Rest assured, I am probably out right now planting or tending to my catnip plants, and willing them to be ready for harvest. I harvest at the point in the growing cycle where the essential oils are at their highest – it’s part of the reason this stuff is so good. Unfortunately, I can’t rush it.

Usually, we get our first harvest in November/December, with a second in January/February. Then it can take up to a month before it’s ready for sale.

I’m planning to dramatically increase my production this year, but like everything I sell, it’s seasonal and strictly limited.

Super Purrwerful Catnip

Spray-free catnip (Nepeta cataria) leaves. Grown over summer 2019-2020 in Orotere, Northland.

Catnip is named due to the effect it has on felines – even lions and tigers have been recorded partaking in the occasional wake and bake. Cats will eat and roll around on catnip to achieve a ‘high’ that will last between 2 and 20 minutes.

While blazed, your cat may become hyper, or they may chill out and relax. The exact effects seem to differ from cat to cat.

Once the buzz wears off, cats then have a natural period where they will not react to catnip. I recommend spacing doses by at least a day to ensure maximum enjoyment.

Up to 1 in 3 cats may not respond to catnip. But cats previously thought to have been immune have shown interest in Kat’s Nip. I suspect this is because the leaves are freshly dried, and provided as whole leaves (not crushed).

Crushing the leaves releases the essential oils, and this is where the active ingredient is found. When you buy crushed catnip products, the essential oils have already been released, making it more or less cabbage.

This may account for why your cat hasn’t been interested in the past: you haven’t provided the dank dank.

Kat’s Nip is tried and tested on dozens of kiwi kitties. At least 4 instances of cats attacking the mail pile have been recorded so far. If your furry pal is going to react to catnip, they will react to this. This is the good stuff.

Kat and one of her cats

Hi! I’m Kat. I grow, harvest, and dry my catnip by hand to give your furry pals the best possible euphoric experience.

My catnip is grown on my lifestyle block near the Bay of Islands. One of the reasons I grow it is to attract bees to my garden – so there are no insecticides on this catnip!

Our three cats love this stuff, and after sharing it with my friends, we noticed a lot of cats love it too. So here I am, sharing it with all Kiwi cats!

Available in two sizes

4.2g bag ($12)

Contains around 15 servings.

Note: refunds are not available if your cat is immune to catnip.

1g Samplurr Baggie ($4)

Contains 3-4 serves.

If you’re not sure whether your cat will react to catnip, this smaller bag will help you find out.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you make this stuff?

Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is a plant related to mint. My catnip is originally grown from seed, though we do split these plants to make more. I grow it on my lifestyle block near Kerikeri.

The catnip is not sprayed with any insecticides. It is fertilised occasionally with a mixture of duck manure and ‘worm juice’ from our worm farm. These are both produced on my farm. You can check out this blog about how I got started, and how the catnip is grown.

I can get two harvests per year out of the plants – usually in about late November/early December, and again in late January/early February. I harvest it at a point in the growth cycle where the essential oils should be at their highest. This is part of why this stuff is so good – I can’t rush it.

After hand-harvesting, it is washed in filtered rain water, drained, and then hung upside down in bunches. It can take up to 2 weeks to dry naturally. By taking a slower approach, I’m preserving the essential oils to give your cat the best buzz.

Once dry, we remove the leaves and buds from the stems. We feed the stems back to our wormfarm and only sell the dried leaves and buds of the plant.

How much is postage?

Postage is via NZ Post Tracked ParcelPost. While the official guidance says it should take 3 days, it may take up to a week to arrive.

All orders are charged a flat rate of $4.50 for postage. There is a rural surcharge of $3.50 if you have an RD address. Please choose this option to ensure you get your Kat’s Nip quickly. If you live at an RD address and do not choose the rural delivery option, I will have to contact you to arrange extra payment, or refund your purchase. This will delay or cancel your order.

If you’ve bought Kat’s Nip before, you might have noticed an increase to the postage cost. After my last batch sold out, I have made improvements to the shipping process. All orders will now be sent with tracking. You will receive an email with your tracking details when your order is dispatched.

Please note, I’m not kidding about cats attacking your mail when it turns up – this has been confirmed by several customers.

How do I use Kat’s Nip?

Take a couple of leaves from the bag and crush them between your fingers to release the essential oils. Offer them to your cat.

Your cat may lick them, or try to smooch your hand. If they show signs of interest, drop the leaves on the ground. Some cats get quite excited and they may end up biting you if you hold onto it.

Your cat may eat or chew the leaves. Or they may roll around on them. In our house there’s not usually much left, but you may need to vacuum up after them.

Will my cat definitely like catnip?

Some cats (up to 30%) just don’t like catnip. If you’re not sure, grab the Samplurr bag to try a smaller amount. Refunds are not available if your cat is non-reactive.

Having said that, sometimes timing is everything. Customers who thought their cat did not like my catnip have reported success on trying again at another point in time. Even my own cats don’t always want it.

We are working on a blend for non-reactive cats – feel free to contact me below if you’d like to be added to a testing list for this. In the meantime, look up ‘Matatabi’ – I don’t sell it, but it’s said to be a good alternative for cats that aren’t into the ‘nip.

Do you make toys?

We’re working on it! It’s the kind of thing I need a partner for. I’m a gardener, not a seamstress. I know exactly how to grow and process the highest quality catnip, but my greatest success behind a sewing machine is a face mask.

If you do have a talent for sewing, and making and/or selling catnip toys is something you are interested in, please get in touch below. I am open to partnerships and new ideas, and strongly believe in promoting the talents of others.

Do you sell internationally?

No, sorry. The catnip has had minimal processing – it is harvested, washed, hung, dried, plucked and packed by hand. There are no added chemicals beyond water and organic fertilisers produced on my farm.

Kat’s Nip simply wouldn’t meet the biosecurity measures outside New Zealand at this point of our business journey

Do you supply wholesale?

I am currently sold out for the 2019/20 season and do not have enough to supply anyone in this capacity.

However, we are gearing up our garden to produce significantly more catnip in the 2020/21 season, and I’d be keen to have a chat in the future.

Wholesale rates begin at a minimum order of 30 bags. It’s really important bags are sold within 1 year to ensure quality.
If you are interested in reselling Kat’s Nip, please get in contact with me below.

Where did you get your bags?

AliExpress. The bags are a mix of paper and plastic. You can find them by looking up ‘Kraft Paper Pouch’. I use the 10x15cm ones.

I am looking for a compostable alternative, but have been unsuccessful so far. If you have a lead on that, I’d really appreciate a heads up – you can contact me below.

Contact Kat